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Wednesday, November 13
 

8:00am

Coffee Break
Coffee Break (Foyer)

Wednesday November 13, 2019 8:00am - 8:30am
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

8:30am

Pre-Conference Workshop #1 - Operator Training, Awareness and Competency
This session will focus on how to conduct a training needs analysis, develop a training matrix and standardize training. We will also look at how conducting a proper incident investigation can help determine if the training and competency process within your organization is adequate to prevent a similar incident from occurring.

Speakers

Wednesday November 13, 2019 8:30am - 11:45am
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

8:30am

Pre-Conference Workshop #2 - Source Water Protection - What Can I do as a Manager or Operator?
This workshop will focus on Source Water Protection, (what it is? what it means?) including practical ideas about what we can do in our local watershed or community to improve our resilience to changes from climate or development and better protect our source water, now and in to the future.

Speakers
avatar for Garry Drachenberg

Garry Drachenberg

Vice President, Water Solutions, Associated Engineering
Garry is the “Vice President of Water Solutions” for the Associated Engineering Group of Companies across Canada.  Garry began his career in 1982 amidst a major recession, which presented distinct job prospect challenges.  With these challenges, however, came opportunities to... Read More →
GD

Grant Dixon

Group Manager ATAP Infrastructure and former CAO, Associated Engineering


Wednesday November 13, 2019 8:30am - 11:45am
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

8:30am

Pre-Conference Workshop #3 - The Science of Pipe Cleaning
This presentation examines wastewater main cleaning procedures and new methods for optimal cleaning results. Participants will learn about the relationship between flow and pressure as well as nozzle design and how that impacts the performance of the equipment. The causes and remedies of “blown toilets” will also be discussed. Attendees will have a better understanding of how to clean lines quicker, more effectively and with less physical effort.

Speakers

Wednesday November 13, 2019 8:30am - 11:45am
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

11:00am

Speaker Ready Room
Speakers submit presentations and bios to Technical Advisor - Meet the room moderators

Moderators
avatar for Erin Ciezki

Erin Ciezki

Technical Program Coordinator, AWWOA

Wednesday November 13, 2019 11:00am - 1:00pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

11:45am

Lunch
Sponsors

Wednesday November 13, 2019 11:45am - 12:45pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

12:45pm

Alberta's Water Innovation Program - Research and Innovation to Support Contemporary and Future Water Management Challenges
The goals for Alberta’s Water for Life Strategy may seem simple: providing Albertans with safe secure drinking water, protecting healthy aquatic ecosystems, and ensuring reliable quality water supplies for a sustainable economy. Achieving these goals is no simple matter. How can Alberta sustainably manage finite water resources with significant population growth, a growing economy that demands water and the need to protect the health of the aquatic ecosystems? Demands for water are further challenged, as future water supplies will become increasingly uncertain and more variable due to climate change. Research and innovation are critical to this strategy and to provide a strong foundation of knowledge and technologies to enable well-informed management decision-making and improve water management practices. To effectively carry out this strategy, Alberta has invested over $60 M in research and innovation to support sustainable water resource management since 2007. The Water Innovation Program (WIP) managed by Alberta Innovates is a flagship program for the Government of Alberta in water innovation.
Decisions made about water will play a critical role in shaping Alberta’s future. Resolving the challenges related to water; its availability or scarcity, its quality, its impact on the health of Albertans, its use by the public and private sectors, and its role in sustaining healthy environments will be compelling factors in almost all decisions in the province, as well as the rest of Canada. Alberta Innovates water-related research portfolio supports investments that advance knowledge and technology in 4 key themes: future water supply and watershed management; healthy aquatic ecosystems; water use conservation, efficiency, and productivity; water quality protection. This presentation will use WIP project outcomes to tell a story of building knowledge to support and inform these critical decisions, with a specific focus on portfolio projects of interest to Alberta’s water and wastewater operators.

Speakers
SC

Susan Carlisle

Alberta Innovates
avatar for John Van Ham

John Van Ham

Executive Director, Alberta Innovates
John is the Executive Director of Environmental Innovation, a division of Alberta Innovates’ Clean Energy Group, which supports innovative research and technology development in the areas of water & wastewater, land & biodiversity, remediation & reclamation, and other environmental... Read More →


Wednesday November 13, 2019 12:45pm - 1:15pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

1:15pm

Alberta Environment and Parks - Lead Guidance Manual Update
In March 2019, Health Canada published a new lead limit for the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality (GCDWQ). The new guideline for lead introduces two (2) fundamental changes from how lead has been managed in drinking water since 1992, namely: the maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for lead was lowered to 5 μg/L; and more importantly, the point of compliance for lead is at the customer’s tap and no longer in the distribution system upstream from the service connection point or property line.
This impacts waterworks systems because the change in the point of compliance will require a shift in how we think about our role and responsibility in producing and distributing drinking water. The goal of waterworks systems1 (referred to as facilities in this document) is the protection of public health; and going forward, treatment and monitoring must consider the impacts of household plumbing. AEP recognizes the challenge of managing lead levels at the customer’s tap. It is a complex issue that, for some facilities, will take many years to resolve.
AEP recommends approaching lead management in two phases:
Phase 1 - Planning, communication and assessment; and
Phase 2 - Mitigation.
The AEP Guidance Document for Managing Lead in Municipal Drinking Water Systems in Alberta: Phase 1 tools for utilities to plan, assess and implement lead management plans for 2020-2024.

Speakers
DL

Debra Long

AEP
Municipal Water Program Specialist. Ms. Long’s program focuses on the implementation of drinking water and wastewater monitoring programs throughout the province. Ms. Long is a professional engineer with over 20 years’ experience in the fields of drinking water and wastewater... Read More →


Wednesday November 13, 2019 1:15pm - 2:00pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

2:00pm

Coffee Break
Sponsors

Wednesday November 13, 2019 2:00pm - 2:15pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

2:15pm

Session A - EPCOR's Industrial Source Control Program, Edmonton, AB
The discharge of prohibited, restricted and hazardous waste into the sewerage system may have adverse effects on human health, the environment, drainage infrastructure, treatment plants and the beneficial use of wastewater biosolids. In addition, these substances may result in the violation of federal or provincial legislation, guidelines and codes of practice. Bylaws prohibiting these harmful practices and an industrial source control program are strong deterrents against the discharge of harmful substances at the point of origin.

The EPCOR Drainage Services Bylaw 18100 and the City of Edmonton Drainage Bylaw 18093 specifies what can and cannot be released into sanitary, combined and storm sewer systems. EPCOR’s Monitoring and Compliance program consists of eight Industrial Wastewater Investigators that perform more than 3000 industrial, commercial and institutional (ICI) inspections each year. Part of these inspections includes responding to spill investigations and complaints from the general public. Investigators review wastewater processes, indoor/outdoor chemical storage areas, drainage fixtures, pretreatment systems, spill procedures and waste disposal documentation.

The main objective of the Industrial Source Control program is to promote educational awareness with ICI’s through regular inspections and collaborative conversations. Where educational awareness is not effective, additional enforcement actions are required such as the issuance of fines or discontinuance of services. The information provided in this session will highlight various complexities of Source Control in a large municipal setting. Topics include: collection/treatment limitations; ICI’s to monitor; Bylaw provisions; inspection planning/processes; documentation review; education and awareness programs; overstrength surcharge program and wastewater transfer station monitoring.


Wednesday November 13, 2019 2:15pm - 2:45pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

2:15pm

Session B - Biofiltration Technology for Drinking Water: Can it be a Stand-Alone Treatment Equipment?
Based on our knowledge and experience, biological treatment technology as a ‘stand-alone’ process to meet desired drinking water quality was less understood. This presentation overviews the process feasibility and design and evaluates the performance of ‘stand-alone’ biological filters at low-temperature groundwater. Groundwater source (4-5 °C) at a small community in Saskatchewan contains ammonia (NH3), iron (Fe), and manganese (Mn) at concentrations of 1.05 mg/L, 1.15 mg/L, and 0.15 mg/L, respectively. Previously, greensand filters with potassium permanganate as an oxidant were in operation to remove Fe and Mn. Higher chlorine demand was observed in this treatment process to convert ammonia, and to achieve break-point chlorination. To avoid the excessive chemical dosing, stand-alone biofiltration was proposed to achieve simultaneous removal of Fe, Mn, and NH4+ from the low-temperature groundwater. The ‘stand-alone’ biofiltration process was opted for the given water source based on its total dissolved solids (TDS) concentration (~500 mg/l). Process feasibility was evaluated through pilot-scale field testing, where the groundwater source at Beauval FN passed through a two-column-in-series biofilter at a targeted flux rate of 3.2 USGPM/ft2. Iron and manganese removal was commendable with little to no acclimation period at the targeted flux rate. Ammonia removal was slower through the biofilters due to low influent temperatures and had an acclimation period close to three months. Illumina-Miseq based 16S rRNA sequencing of pilot-scale biofilter samples revealed an enrichment of bacterial populations that support biological Fe, Mn, and NH4+ oxidation. Implementing the pilot-concept in to a full-scale unit at Beauval FN has achieved consistent and targeted ‘simultaneous’ removal of Fe, Mn, and NH4+ from the low-temperature groundwater. This ‘stand-alone’ biofilter design at Beauval FN has produced water quality that meets Canadian drinking water guidelines and has demonstrated this process design can be a feasible approach for other full-scale applications.

Speakers
BR

Babak Roshani

Delco Water division of Delco Automation


Wednesday November 13, 2019 2:15pm - 2:45pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

2:15pm

Session C - Successful Upgrade Commissioning - Town of Mayerthorpe Water Distribution System
Every facility will have to incorporate some degree of retrofit or upgrade during its life cycle. As it is rarely feasible to demolish and rebuild existing systems in their entirety, commissioning existing facilities is inevitable and incorporates additional risks associated with manipulation of running systems that are often critical. Water and wastewater owners, operators, engineers and technicians have all had their share of experiences, good and bad, related to commissioning processes. Additionally, all have had further layers of complexity imposed on implementing the same during normal operation. In the end, these systems all become operational, but there is a notable difference in the overall success of a project based upon approaches, roles and responsibilities, coordination, understanding of inter-dependencies, and sequence of events. In addition to discussing methods to optimize commissioning on existing facilities, this presentation will provide a case study on commissioning of the Mayerthorpe water distribution system upgrades in order to demonstrate challenges, risks, and disaster avoidance on a running water distribution system and water treatment plant.

Key points will discuss:
• Definition of commissioning and surrounding phases.
• Typical stakeholders involved in the commissioning process.
• Roles and responsibilities.
• Feasible commissioning plans.
• Extent of backup systems.
• Dealing with the never ending “what if’s”.
• Common pitfalls, concessions and shortcuts experienced.
• Examination of some alternative commissioning methods and discussion of how they address the items above.
• Systems optomizations.


Wednesday November 13, 2019 2:15pm - 2:45pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

2:45pm

Session A - The Who, What and Where of Gas Detection
Catalytic bead, electrochemical, infrared… confused yet? Multiple technologies are used today to detect flammable and toxic gases, but which technology is the best fit for your specific application? What factors do I need to consider when determining the best locations for me sensors?
This workshop provides you with an overview of the technologies used in the industry today for the detection of flammable gases and toxic gases. Each technology has its advantages and considerations; these advantages and considerations are discussed in this workshop allowing you to make an educated choice for your gas detection system with respect to the available detection technologies.
Proper sensor placement is critical to ensuring a robust, effective gas detection system. In this workshop we will also review industry best practices when it comes to determining the best location to place sensors, and we will also provide examples of installations it water treatment facilities throughout North America.

Speakers
GW

Geoff Wilson

Territory Sales Manager, Sierra Monitor Corporation


Wednesday November 13, 2019 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

2:45pm

Session B - Solving or Prevention of Power Quality Issues in Pumping Stations
Many users do not know that they have Power Quality Issues and they live with the random consequences of these Power Quality issues. Sometimes these problems are considered as minor nuisance issues causing random tripping or stopping of equipment. The equipment can be reset and started again and operated for extended periods before the next nuisance trip.
The Power Quality issues can be more severe such that it can cause overheating in the electrical equipment and even cause equipment to fail prematurely.
This presentation will discuss the source for the Power Quality issues and provide proven solutions to mitigate or prevent the issue from being a concern.
In todays’ pumping stations, the electrical system is primary supplied with solid state equipment which can create several different power quality problems that distorts the voltage and current waveforms in the building. Power Quality Issues increase proportionally with the percentage of solid state equipment (Non-Linear Loads) to the average Power consumption of the Pumping Station. When the total solid state non-linear load is less than 20 percent of the average building load, then the Power Quality Issues are considered very low and do not cause significant operating issues. However when the solid state non-linear loads exceeds 50% of the average building load, then severe Power Quality Issues will occur causing equipment to overheat, nuisance tripping and interference with communication and radio signals.
This scenario exceeds the Power Quality Harmonics Limits set by the Utility as conditions for receiving Power to the Pumping Station. The user must install harmonic mitigation equipment to stay within the guidelines set by the Utility.
Major equipment that can generate significant Power Quality Problems is listed below:
-Variable Frequency Drives
-Solid State Reduced Voltage Starters
-Solid State Lighting Systems, (LED lamps)
-Vacuum Contactors
-Computers and Programmable Logic Controllers
-DC Power supplies
Attendees can receive electronic copy of presentation and other info  on the above topics by dropping off business card at the Higrid Power Booth #55.

Speakers
avatar for PAUL WRIGHT

PAUL WRIGHT

ENGINEERING MANAGER, HIGRID POWER
I am a Power Quality Engineer with over 40 years of experience with designing, installing and commissioning AC and DC Drives since 1978.Author of 200 page handbook written for CEATI (138 global utilities) about issues and mitigation solutions with installing VFDs.


Wednesday November 13, 2019 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

2:45pm

Session C - St. Albert's Transformation with a Smart Water Network

The City of St. Albert faced several critical challenges as a result of their antiquated water meter system. The City needed to find a solution that would resolve their meter reading issues while simultaneously helping them meet the demand for enhanced customer service and community engagement.
In 2018, a Smart City AMI program was implemented to upgrade the City’s existing meter system to a technology that would address the City’s current challenges as well as meet their future needs. St. Albert has recently completed upgrading 22,000 water meters and have implemented a robust AMI system. This program was sponsored by Brian Brost, the City’s Manager of Utilities who had discussed with and learned from peers who had implemented similar projects which helped the City complete their program in under 9 months.
Since completion, St. Albert has accomplished much more than originally planned with the AMI data that is being captured. They have successfully initiated a customer service communication program with positive feedback from residents, as well as successfully integrated new processes and technology into their water department. This session will review their lessons learned through the implementation of an AMI system as well as the following:
• An overview of St. Alberts goals for their AMI program
• Effective execution of an AMI and water meter upgrade program
• The customer service benefits resulting from AMI technology
• Discuss the successes, lessons learned and unique insights for communities considering an AMI program
• Effective change management and St. Alberts AMI training program

Speakers
avatar for Brian Brost

Brian Brost

Manager of Utilities, City of St. Albert


Wednesday November 13, 2019 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

3:15pm

Session A - O&M Considerations for Pressure Sewer Systems
Traditionally, pressure sewer systems have been used to provide sewer service to areas where gravity sewer could not be installed, or the cost to do so was prohibitive. Now, pressure sewer systems are gaining widespread acceptance in providing a viable, sustainable, and cost effective solution for communities considering new wastewater collection systems due to failing on-site septic tank disposal systems or for replacing failed gravity systems. The advantages of pressure sewer systems over new construction of gravity sewers or gravity sewer renewal include low construction costs, fewer community impacts, and lower environmental impact and disturbance.
Misconceptions of low pressure sewer systems can create apprehension for communities considering an appropriate solution for their wastewater collection needs. Municipal and utility administrators, engineers, and operating personnel may be reluctant to incorporate low pressure sewers due to concerns on the operation and maintenance efforts and costs. While there may be no universal answer to questions that are raised, the experience of communities that have incorporated low pressure sewer systems can provide a reliable indication on the true impact and cost of ownership for these systems.
This presentation provides data on several pressure sewer installations and demystifies concerns related to operation, maintenance, reliability, and the cost of ownership. Mean-Time-Between-Service-Calls and actual maintenance costs for low pressure sewer components will be presented. Through a retrospective examination of the service history of low pressure sewer systems, the presentation will demonstrate that successful installations with reliable operation is an achievable standard.

Speakers

Wednesday November 13, 2019 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

3:15pm

Session B - Data = Decisions: Advancements in Data Management
No matter what the industry is today, everything is about the data. Data is analyzed daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly all to help people understand what the best decisions one can are make from this for whatever reason.

The same is true in our industry today, as all types of data is being collected with various technology for wastewater systems. HD Video, Digital Scanning, Laser Profiling, XYZ Mapping, and Sonar are just a few emerging technologies that are used to collect large amounts of data on our ever-worsening infrastructure. The questions are, how are we managing that data and how are we analyzing this data to efficiently make fiscally responsible decisions for system maintenance and repair?

This presentation will focus on just that question. We will look at these numerous ways to collect data and how we can effectively manage and analyzing the data to prioritize our worst assets via GIS maps and cloud-based software. This will allow us to then assign accurate budgetary figures needed for maintenance and repair in the most efficient way possible.

Speakers
JM

Jay Mclean

Joe Johnson Equipment


Wednesday November 13, 2019 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

3:15pm

Session C - "The Hydrant Buddy"
Speakers

Wednesday November 13, 2019 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

4:00pm

Session A - Spiral Heat Exchange an Effective Tool to Reduce Energy Consumption for WWTP
The majority of today’s wastewater treatment plants utilize anaerobic digestion techniques for biological stabilization of municipal sewage sludge. These plants which today are an integral part of any community are tremendous consumers of energy With energy costs constantly on the rise and consumption closely monitored, existing plants, some of them retrofitted, and new plants alike are installing plate and spiral heat exchangers in an effort to reduce energy consumption, and so improve operating efficiencies.

Each type, however, is considered for very different reasons. Plate heat exchangers may be selected for their high thermal efficiency and minimum capital investment. Spiral heat exchangers, on the other hand, are turned to for their ability to effectively handle fluids containing solids and fibers, similar to those encountered in wastewater treatment plants.


Speakers
avatar for Rana Elbittibssi

Rana Elbittibssi

Branch Manager, Xylem
A professional engineer hold bachelor and master degree in mechanical engineering from Concordia University Montreal, Quebec. Running a Xylem Edmonton location as a branch manager, that cover Northern Alberta, NWT & NU regions. I do have more than 20 years of experience in pumps... Read More →


Wednesday November 13, 2019 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

4:00pm

Session B - On-site Rapid Testing of Water Samples for E. Coli and Total Coliform
Regular testing of water samples for E. coli and Total Coliform is a crucial part of water safety. Current standard laboratory microbiological water tests are commonly not accessible in rural communities, require a high skill level to undertake, and do not offer timely results to waterworks operators. In the current scheme, operators typically have to collect samples from water treatment sites and points within the distribution system. The samples have to be shipped within a prescribed time frame to large centralized laboratories for testing and the results are returned 2-5 days later.
To address these issues, Roshan Water Solutions has developed VeloCens™; a portable reader and nanotechnology-based disposable cartridge system used for rapid, on-site microbiological detection and enumeration in water. It allows operators to automatically log and analyze samples, and report results within 1 hour; representing at least a 12-fold time decrease compared to standard lab tests. Product plans include enabling communication with a secure central database providing operators as well as, community and government officials access to data 24/7/365.
With a rapid detection system, officials can take required measures faster and avoid outbreaks; the most serious being the E. coli outbreak of 2000 in Walkerton, Ontario which saw 2500 people ill and 7 lives lost. In Alberta, as of July 8, 2019, there are 16 reported active boil water advisories affecting 200,000 Albertans, one dating back to 2011 (Kehewin Cree Nation). Having the ability to spot check water quality at any point in the water treatment and distribution network, provides communities with a tool to troubleshoot and quickly identify when water is SAFE for public consumption.
With VeloCens™, microbiological testing in drinking water can be done "anywhere by anyone". In this presentation, the working principles of VeloCensTM along with the evolution of a science-based proof of concept to a working technology will be explained. In addition, the current state of the technology and the future development path to a market ready commercially available product will be described.

Speakers
AS

Amirreza Sohrabi

Roshan Water Solutions


Wednesday November 13, 2019 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

4:00pm

Session C - National Foundational Document: I/I in New Sanitary Sewers
I/I is excess storm water and rain water that enters sanitary and storm sewer systems. Negative impacts of I/I include loss of capacity in trunk sewer systems, loss of development-related revenue for municipalities where development freezes exist due to limited sewer system capacity, and reduced infrastructure lifespan. Increased risk of basement flooding from sewer backup, as well as acute operational difficulties associated with wet weather peaking in wastewater systems, and bypasses at pumping stations and wastewater treatment plants, are additional negative impacts of excess I/I.

Re-capturing capacity in existing sewer systems is becoming increasingly important as highly developed urban areas across Canada continue to emphasize infill development. Sewers full of I/I also have less capacity to convey potential increased flows associated with changing frequency and severity of extreme rainfall events anticipated with changing climate conditions.

While it is accepted that I/I exists in older sanitary sewers, flow monitoring data and extensive surveys of development stakeholders indicate that I/I is occurring widely in newly constructed sanitary sewers (as measured in subdivisions) as well. Excess I/I in new systems appears to be related to several factors, including differing municipal- and private-side design as well as construction and inspection standards and practices. Behavioural and jurisdictional issues also appear to be factors influencing the generation of this I/I.


Wednesday November 13, 2019 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

6:30pm

YP Networking Night - 6:30pm to 9:30pm - Sponsored by: Algae Control Canada
Join us at the Fionn MacCool's for YP Night. (10813 170 St NW, Edmonton)
Enjoy some appetizers and conversation with your fellow industry professionals.
All industry professionals are welcome! Door Prizes at 9pm!
Sponsored by Algae Control Canada


Wednesday November 13, 2019 6:30pm - 9:30pm
Fionn MacCool's 10813 170 St NW, Edmonton, AB
 
Thursday, November 14
 

7:30am

Speaker Ready Room
Speakers submit presentations and bios to Technical Advisor - Meet the room moderators

Moderators
avatar for Erin Ciezki

Erin Ciezki

Technical Program Coordinator, AWWOA

Thursday November 14, 2019 7:30am - 8:30am
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

8:00am

Coffee Break
Sponsors

Thursday November 14, 2019 8:00am - 8:30am
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

8:30am

Session A - Delivery Methods for Successful Municipal Water and Wastewater Projects
Speakers

Thursday November 14, 2019 8:30am - 9:00am
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

8:30am

Session B - Designing a Customized Water and Wastewater Process Lab for the Training of Operators
There are growing challenges in conventional water and wastewater treatment process due to the present of new contaminants, growing complexity of industrial activities, the rapid growth of population, and compliance with standards and regulations. Those challenges have driven the whole industry to optimize the present treatment process and search for new technologies. Those changes require operators to not only master the routine operations but also understand the technical issues and troubleshoot the problems.
This presentation describes the designing and construction of a customized water and wastewater process lab at SAIT, which will be used for the training of water and wastewater treatment operators. This process lab will enable operators to operate lab-scale conventional water and wastewater treatment units, as well as emerging techniques, such as membrane filtration. All the lab equipment is equipped with DeltaV, which enables operators to interact with the treatment units using an industrial control system. The treatment units are designed as “plug and play” products. This allows operators to reconnect various units into different treatment process and acquire experience in the real behavior of the system. Hence, this process lab will enhance operators learning experience with hands-on operation. It also provides an option for them to identify problems, research solutions, and present their findings.

Speakers

Thursday November 14, 2019 8:30am - 9:00am
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

8:30am

Session C - Alberta Case Studies: Eliminating Confined Space Entry in Air Release Valve Chambers
Alberta Public Works departments face a constant struggle with managing operations budgets, time, and safety throughout the province. One of the most prevalent conditions that need to be addressed in both these aspects are confined space entry requirements and procedures – specifically in air release valve chambers. Costly and time-consuming operations to perform maintenance on these valves has led manufacturers to look at methods of increasing operator safety while alleviating budget costs.
Recently, the Taza Exchange on the Tsuut’ina Nation and the Castle Waterline near Crowsnest Pass utilized emerging technology in combination air release / vacuum valve technology in order to elimate the manhole chamber that is typically required for this type of installation. This paper will review these two projects for the view of specification, installation and operation in the form of separate case studies.
The purpose of this White Paper is to review the results in terms of monetary cost to the municipality – as determined by comparing capital costs as well as maintenance costs; as well as time and safety factors for municipal operators. In addition to a technical review, having both the specifying engineer from MPE and technical representative from H-Tec will allow for dedicated information for all aspects of the installation and maintenance of this project.


Thursday November 14, 2019 8:30am - 9:00am
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

9:00am

Session A - Wastewater Treatment Plants – The Unseen Hazards
You see them and drive past them all the time. Every community has one. Chances are that a close neighbor, one of your friends, or even a member of your family may work in one. When low-pressure sets in, and the wind blows in the right direction, the stench may be horrific. But that smell is only a hint to the unseen hazards that you might encounter when working at a wastewater treatment plant.
In their very design, processes involved in sewage treatment produce and use a number of highly toxic and explosive gases, requiring wastewater monitoring to ensure the safety of both employees and the environment.
There are three main gases to be aware of when designing monitoring systems for wastewater treatment facilities:
Hydrogen Sulfide: A highly toxic gas produced wherever large holding tanks or settling basins are located. Because few of these areas conform to normal square footage guidelines, sensors are located as required near probable H2S sources.
Methane: Also known as natural gas, methane is an explosive gas (L.E.L 5% volume) produced primarily in the initial stages of decomposition. Because of its low density, methane will accumulate in pockets near the ceiling of enclosed areas such as holding tanks and settling basins.
Oxygen: Because of the high number of chemical and organic processes occurring in any wastewater treatment plant, adequate levels of oxygen must be maintained to ensure worker safety. Oxygen sensors should be located in enclosed areas, wherever oxygen levels may be in question.
Purifying Chemicals: Chemicals such as ammonia ozone and chlorine are all used in the decontamination of water, both in waste water and water purification plants.
Elimination of these gas hazards is virtually impossible, so workers and contractors must depend on reliable gas detection equipment to protect them. Although there is not one gas monitor that will protect every worker in every situation, a basic multi-gas monitor is a good place to start.
Unfortunately, protecting workers from the dangers of gas hazards is not as easy as simply handing them a gas detector and sending them out the door. If workers do not use their monitors properly, or do not understand how their monitors work, or do not know how to react to the readings, gas detection devices will not be very effective.
Conclusion:
This paper and presentation will outline the ways to protect workers and those exposed to the Unseen Hazards. The information provided will outline the reliable and effective gas detection monitoring and training required to protect personnel, the facilities and the environment.

Speakers

Thursday November 14, 2019 9:00am - 9:45am
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

9:00am

Session B - Complete Utility Locate System (Do's & Don'ts)
As underground utility damage continues to increase, and networks expand, it’s of critical importance that utilities and municipalities ensure future detection of their assets long after installation.

In this presentation, you will learn the basic principles of underground utility locating and the importance of grounding your system to establish a complete circuit. You will understand how to specify best-fit locating systems, proper installation techniques, dos and don’ts, and how to test your system for accuracy. 1. Principles of locating
2. Best practices for tracer wire specification, installation and testing
3. Product training
4. Installation dos and don’ts

Speakers

Thursday November 14, 2019 9:00am - 9:45am
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

9:00am

Session C - Understand and Proactively Manage Your Water System Faster & More Efficiently with Integrated Pressure & Temperature Sensors
Today’s business environment demands informed decision-making. It’s essential to provide superior customer service, use our water and energy resources wisely, efficiently manage operations, and achieve regulatory compliance – all while continuing to control revenue and resources. The next generation in ultrasonic and electromagnetic meters as specified in the new AWWA C715 standard are designed for high measurement accuracy and long-term reliability with built-in meter alarms to provide early detection of flow, temperature, and pressure disturbance. With this information, utilities are able to better understand and proactively manage their smart water meter reading systems faster and more efficiently. This presentation will discuss electronic meter technologies and how sensors can support distribution system management and how interval data and smart software can support water efficiency via District Area Metering.


Thursday November 14, 2019 9:00am - 9:45am
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

9:45am

Trade Show - 9:45pm to 2:30pm
A great variety of Trade Show Booths highlighting the latest industry products, services and technologies. Great prizes - given throughout the event - MUST BE THERE TO COLLECT PRIZES. Check your registration package for details.

Thursday November 14, 2019 9:45am - 2:30pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

12:00pm

Lunch
Express Sandwich (Back of Trade Show)

Sponsors

Thursday November 14, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

2:30pm

Coffee Break
Sponsors

Thursday November 14, 2019 2:30pm - 2:45pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

2:45pm

Session A - Options for Achieving Low and Ultra-Low Phosphorus and Metals Targets
With phosphorus-fed algae blooms plaguing many North American bodies of water and the danger of metals rising in the public consciousness, regulators put increasing pressure on wastewater treatment facilities to meet ever-lower phosphorus and metals limits. Additionally, there are further challenges to achieve more with less – meaning using the most reliable treatment system available, while also simplifying operations and minimizing both capital and life-cycle costs.

Acceptable phosphorus levels vary significantly from region to region, including

Speakers

Thursday November 14, 2019 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

2:45pm

Session B - Operations Problem Solving – Experiences and Lessons Learned
Typically in water treatment construction projects, once all of the equipment is installed, a very long lengthy commissioning period follows, when the contractor starts up the systems and hands them over to the operators. After commissioning, as the operators run the systems day to day, they often find some issues or quirks that need to be solved. The process of addressing these issues involves the manufacturer’s representatives, who bring their experience with similar equipment at other sites to try and resolve problems. It is a learning process for all involved.

Lac la Biche WTP has undergone several upgrades in recent years, and after each project there have been some tweaking and experimentation to get the plant to smooth daily operation. For this presentation, the speakers will share the process of problem identification, the problem solving process and lessons learned for future upgrades. The focus will be on the chemical feed and polymer systems installed during projects from 2016 to 2018.

Speakers
AC

Abu Chowdhury

Lac La Biche County


Thursday November 14, 2019 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

2:45pm

Session C - Relining Critical Water Mains in the City of Calgary
Problem Statement:
Traditional thermoplastic materials provide an established low pressure technology for pipeline applications offering enhanced corrosion resistance over traditional rigid metallic pipes. Despite the advantages of flexibility and corrosion resistance, applications of thermoplastic pipes are limited by pressure capacity.

Motivation:
The development of aramid-reinforced flexible plastic pipes opens up new fields of applications in renewal of high-pressure lines carrying water. These pipes make it possible to achieve maximum operating pressures of 900psi in the diameter range of 150 to 500 mm.
This innovative pipe lining system can be installed with lengths up to two kilometres in one single pull – including through bends.

Approach:
Para-aramid was invented and first marketed by DuPont in the early seventies.
It is used as reinforcement in a variety of engineering applications – ranging from car tyres to ropes and cables, from pressure hoses for turbo motors to ballistic protection.
Aramid is a product that combines properties like high tenacity with low weight.
These properties of this high grade material make it possible to construct a flexible lining system for high demands in the water field.

Results:
Aramid-reinforced flexible pipes are a new innovative re-lining system based on an aramid-fabric. The strength of the fabric allows bursting pressures of over 1000psi even with a wall thickness of six to eight millimetres.
The aramid-fabric is coated on the outside with wear-resistant polyethylene and on the inside with modified plastics suitable for the regarded medium.
The flexible pipes are available in nominal widths from 150 up to 500 mm. The system is certified for the renewal of pipes in the water field with an operating pressure of higher than 700psi.

Conclusion:
The relining with aramid-reinforced flexible pipes is a simple, efficient and self-supporting pipe replacement system. The plastic pipeline is installed by a draw winch using the existing pipe route. The old pipe is only used as a sleeve to withstand the soil pressure.
The system offers the unique combination of the benefits of a trenchless technology (minimising excavation works, maintenance of pipelines in difficult terrain) with the advantage of classical pipeline construction (new pressure pipework offering a maximum of service life and safety).
The connection of the flexible plastic pipe to steel, cast, PE or other pipe materials is enabled with specially designed couplings.

Other consideration:
1. Ability to negotiate four 45 degree bends with a radius of 3 x D in one installation section.
2. Since the area is difficult to access and traditional open trench methods are expensive and time consuming
3. CSA / NSF 61 Standard for potable water certificate
4. INTRODUCTION TO CALGARY’S WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM
5. CALGARYS WATER SYSTEM HAS OF OVER 5000KM OF PIPES
6. COMMONLY USED MATERIAL CAST IRON, DUCTILE IRON AND PVC TO RELINE
7. PROBLEM PIPES WERE INDENTIFIED AND RELINED
8. NOSE CREEK/ HORTON ROAD /SHAGANAPPI / MAPLEGLADE
9. SIPHONS / CREEK CROSSINGS / HIGHWAY CROSSINGS / INTERSECTIONS
10. CATHODIC PROTECTION
11. SLIP LINING

Speakers
AM

Alois Multerer

Key Account Manager, Primus Line Canada Inc.


Thursday November 14, 2019 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

3:15pm

Session A - Ammonia Permits and Lagoons: First Nations Communities and the Options Available for Beating Nutrient Limits
Ammonia limits are becoming commonplace in lagoon-based wastewater treatment facility permits nationwide as regulators seek to protect wildlife in receiving waterways. This is forcing First Nations communities in western Canada to make an often-difficult decision: can lagoons meet tight limits, even when water temperatures plunge? This was in fact the same question faced by Lake St. Martin, Manitoba.

Through the lens of the case of Lake St. Martin’s lagoon-based wastewater treatment facility, constructed in 2016, this presentation digs into the many local and scientific factors that can influence this decision. They include the relevant local factors that limit lagoon-based nitrification, such as lack of dissolved oxygen, too much competition from BOD-consuming heterotrophic bacteria, and lack available surface area, or cold winter water temperatures. The presentation then explores the merits and costs of mechanical plants and introduces the SAGR post-lagoon nitrification option that reduces ammonia to

Speakers

Thursday November 14, 2019 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

3:15pm

Session B - Granular Media Filtration is a Batch Process: Comparison of Various Backwash Procedures and the Effect on Filter Performance
The backwash steps discussed will include:
• Filter drain-down
• Air scour, including rates and duration
• Low-rate and high-rate backwash, including flowrate and duration
• Filter media restratification

The presentation will provide Operators with answers to the following questions:
• What is the relationship between poor filter performance and backwash?
• How long does it take to see the effect of a poor backwash program on filter performance?
• How long does it take to see the effect of changes made to the backwash program on filter performance?
• How can the backwash procedure contribute to filter media loss?
• Which backwash procedure is the best?
• Which backwash parameters and data should the Operator be monitoring, trending and collecting?

The presentation will also discuss:
• Stand-alone air scour and backwash vs. concurrent air-water wash: Which is better?
• Backwash turbidity profile: What does it tell us? What doesn’t it tell us?
• Monitoring and trending of backwash pressure: Why is it a critical part of filter operation?


Thursday November 14, 2019 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

3:15pm

Session C - EPCOR Water Distribution and Transmission - Water Main Break Repair
• Scope of work: The maintenance department of EPCOR Water D&T handles all the repair work that requires an excavation. Most of the maintenance work we cover is within the City of Edmonton, though there is some work we cover out of town (ex: Edmonton International Airport). We will go over the number of valves, hydrants, service lines, and km’s of pipe we are in charge of maintaining, and the number and size of crews we have out in the field. As well touch on some of the other departments and some of the repair work they can do without requiring excavation.

• Pipe material: Cover the top 3 types of pipe material in the Edmonton distribution network and the challenges and hazards we face dealing with each one. Asbestos Cement pipe for example requires us to take many extra steps to work with and handle safely. Also touch on how much of the City of Edmonton’s distribution network has been replaced with PVC pipe.

• Hazards associated with underground excavation: Maintenance does over 1200 excavations a year. A large amount of these involve maneuvering our work around other utilities (Power, Gas Mains, Communications, etc.) One of the biggest hazards our crews face on a daily basis is the heavily saturated soil we work in. We will go over some of the shoring methods we use to safely get a worker down into a ditch with class C soil.

• Water Main Breaks: This is the bulk of the presentation. In 2018 we had over 340 water main breaks in the City of Edmonton. EPCOR Water has made a commitment to the customers in Edmonton to have the water back on in 24 hours due to a main break. We will cover from start to finish how our crews fix these breaks in a timely manner. Main points will be on how we diagnose the cause of the leaks quickly, the use of leak detection, our excavation procedures, and our repair methods.

Speakers

Thursday November 14, 2019 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

4:00pm

Session A - A Stormwater Management Pond Even an Operator Can Love
As some of the most visible pieces of major stormwater infrastructure in communities, stormwater ponds can be a nightmare for operations staff. They can be 311 complaint call generating machines and futile attempts to address algae blooms, weeds, and smells consume maintenance staff labour hours like Tic Tacs. A lower maintenance solution is needed for managing stormwater runoff.

The Stormwater Kidney™ system is a stormwater management facility designed specifically for ease of maintenance and to be aesthetically desirable for community residents. A small and easy to access portion of the system, called the Nautilus Pond®, is devoted to efficiently removing sediment and floating materials. Dewatering this sediment removal area is accomplished almost entirely by gravity in a matter of hours by opening a valve. This allows O&M staff to visually inspect for sediment accumulation, and to safely execute sediment removal operations, rather than having to survey a large pond area from a boat. Floating material collection and removal is accomplished at a single location rather than by roaming around a pond looking for scattered bits of debris.

The Stormwater Kidney™ system uses a low power recirculation system to turn over water several times per week through treatment wetlands and vegetated areas to naturally remove nutrients from water. With reduced nutrients in the water, outbreaks of weeds and algae can be controlled without any intervention from O&M staff. Vegetated areas are designed to be self-maintaining with native plant mixes that naturally control weeds and should never be mowed.

Examples of the kind of achievable and low maintenance operating environments associated with a Stormwater Kidney™ system will be presented and discussed.

Speakers

Thursday November 14, 2019 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

4:00pm

Session B - Ceramic Filter Media - An Alternative to Dual Filter Media: A Pilot-Case Study at City of Saskatoon WTP
A replacement to dual-media filtration, a conventional treatment method, with ceramic filter media is proposed through this study. Filtralite, a porous ceramic filter media with high surface area, is evaluated as an alternative to anthracite/sand filter media at City of Saskatoon WTP.
City of Saskatoon WTP, current treatment capacity of 280MLD, is targeting an expansion to their treatment capacity (400 MLD) to meet future demands. Filtration basin with anthracite/sand dual-media, a component of existing treatment process, identified as one of the main constraints for increasing the production. As a part of their on-going rehabilitation work, Filtralite media was chosen for pilot-scale evaluation against anthracite/sand filter dual-media with an intent to increase production while minimizing capital expansion and operating costs.
Pilot-scale study was conducted on multiple filter columns that are operated in parallel to each other with varying bed depths. Filter columns were operated at variable flow rates between 3 to 5 L/s that mimics and exceeds the current treatment design characteristics. Filtralite and anthracite/sand dual-media were compared for their performance based on filter run time, head loss profiles, turbidity, and backwashing characteristics. Head loss limit of 1 meter and turbidity limit of 0.3 NTU are developed for filter backwashing and to end filter cycle.
Filtralite media was consistent in reducing turbidity to less than 0.1 NTU compared to anthracite/sand dual-media at influent water temperatures of 0.8 °C to17.8 °C. In addition, Filtralite media has indicated reduced head loss development for same run time compared to anthracite/sand dual-media. The performance of was consistent under all seasons; where head loss development was reduced with filter aging. Longer filter run times are achieved, 180% increase in volume/run times, with Filtralite media compared to anthracite/sand dual-media. Overall, based on the pilot-scale study at City of Saskatoon WTP, Filtralite media has indicated extended run times, reduced backwash volumes, and lower filter ripening volumes compared to anthracite/sand dual-media.
From this study, we propose, Filtralite media can be an alternative to anthracite/sand dual media which potentially extends run lengths, reduces backwash volumes, saves energy, and improves the overall performance of gravity filtration basins.

Speakers
SR

Sandeep Raja Dangeti

Delco Water - A Division of Delco Automation Inc.


Thursday November 14, 2019 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

4:00pm

Session C - City of Calgary Feedermain Condition Assessment: 2018 Success Stories
The City of Calgary has long taken a proactive approach to the management of their feedermain network. This includes an advanced condition assessment strategy that combines an inspection program and risk analyses to better develop an understanding of the safety and reliability of the network. The program began in 2004, after a 1200-mm feedermain catastrophically failed and released 20 ML of water, flooding a roadway and disrupting service to over 100,000 customers. Over the years, successful inspections have allowed the City to proactively repair damaged pipes. In 2018, the City completed multiple inline inspections with the SmartBall® leak and air pocket detection tool, identifying major leaks on two critical Feedermains. The inspections pinpointed the leak locations, allowing the City to repair and potentially prevent a catastrophic failure.

This presentation will provide an overview of Calgary’s long-term strategy in regard to the management of their feedermain network, while highlighting recent success stories, including damaged pipes that were identified and repaired prior to a failure.

Speakers

Thursday November 14, 2019 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,

7:00pm

Networking Event - Casino Night - Sponsored by: Biomaxx
Experience a fun money casino with great games and fun prizes to be awarded at the end of the night! The night is Vegas-themed and a photo booth will be available to capture fun moments from the evening. Sponsered by Biomaxx

Sponsors

Thursday November 14, 2019 7:00pm - 10:00pm
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,
 
Friday, November 15
 

8:30am

The Value of Source Water - Alberta Perspectives
Five Presentations representing various Source Water Protection Programs and Initiatives in Alberta:
• Protecting Sources of Drinking Water in Alberta - Presented by Phil Boehme
• The City of Edmonton’s Source Water Protection Plan - Presented by Mike Christensen
• The City of Calgary’s Source Water Protection Plan - Presented by Harpeet Sandhu
• The Grimshaw Gravels Aquifer Experience - Presented by Adam Norris
• It takes a Watershed to Sustain a Community - Presented by Leah Kongsrude

Speakers
avatar for Phil Boehme

Phil Boehme

Planner, Alberta Environment and Parks
Over the past 20 years, Phil has led watershed management projects with all levels of government, industry, Indigenous communities and environmental organizations. Currently, Phil is a Co-chair for the Alberta Water Council’s project - Protecting Sources of Drinking Water in Alberta... Read More →
HS

Harpeet Sandhu

Harpreet Sandhu, is the Team Lead of the Water Resource Strategy team at the City of Calgary Water Utility. Her responsibilities include leading the development of strategic water management plans and policies in the areas of source water protection, waterways protection, watershed... Read More →
LK

Leah Kongsrude

Leah Kongsrude is the Executive Director for the North Saskatchewan Watershed Alliance (NSWA) which is one of eleven  Watershed Planning and Advisory Councils appointed by the Alberta government. The NSWA is guided by the provincial Water for Life strategy and partners with government... Read More →


Friday November 15, 2019 8:30am - 11:45am
Double Tree by Hilton 16615 109th Avenue North West, Edmonton, Alberta,